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25 years ago today

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  • 25 years ago today

    The Challenger exploded killing all aboard. RIP.

  • #2
    Wow. I know where I was when it happened...

    I was in a knitting mill in North Carolina installing some industrial controls. I can't believe it's been 25 years.

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    • #3
      I was an Air Force Recruiter on N Broad St in Philly

      Word circulated what happened. The AF Reserve Recruiting office upstairs had a tv--we locked the office door and ran up to watch the news. We could hardly believe what we were watching.

      Two years ago with my middle daughter and a British colleague, and last summer with my wife, we visited Arlington National Cemetery and visited the shuttle memorials--very moving. What I don't understand is why they have a separate grave for Francis Scobee, who was the Challenger's commander. I didn't think any of them were found.

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      • #4
        One of my favorite Presidential addresses

        "The fact is, we carefully edit our reality, searching for evidence that confirms what we already believe. Although we pretend we’re empiricists — our views dictated by nothing but the facts — we’re actually blinkered, especially when it comes to information that contradicts our theories." - Jonah Lehrer

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        • #5
          I Was Editting Some Tape For My Sportscasts

          One of the DJs came in and said, "We need the room -- Keith (our newsman on duty) has to get in here NOW because the Challenger blew up."

          I had headphones on and I wasn't sure I heard him correctly -- he repeated simply, "It blew up."

          Truly one of those "you never forget where you were" moments.
          "If I owned Texas and Hell, I'd rent out Texas and live in Hell!"

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          • #6
            I was sitting

            in a chair waiting to get my shots. Fort Carson Colorado, first Duty station. Was there only a day prior. I watched it live and it didn't seem real. It took a little bit to accept that had happen.

            Thanks for the Reagan Clip. Miss those days
            no sig

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            • #7
              They Recovered The Crew Cabin Intact

              Scobee was entitled to a military burial because he was a Lt. Colonel in the Air Force.
              "If I owned Texas and Hell, I'd rent out Texas and live in Hell!"

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              • #8
                Lobby of the criminal courthouse on Queens Blvd ... overheard people talking about it at the newsstand as I walked past.

                Major WTF moment.
                Obscenity is the last refuge of an inarticulate motherfucker.

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                • #9
                  Yeah, I understand he was in the military

                  Originally posted by Kelly Green View Post
                  Scobee was entitled to a military burial because he was a Lt. Colonel in the Air Force.
                  But I didn't know they recovered part of the shuttle. My understanding was that is was totally gone.

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                  • #10
                    They Recovered Quite A Bit Of It

                    The big discovery was the crew cabin which survived the explosion -- a least one of the astronauts was still alive because the emergency oxygen packs that they wore on their chests, had been activated for both Scobee and pilot Mike Smith and that had to be done manually.
                    "If I owned Texas and Hell, I'd rent out Texas and live in Hell!"

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                    • #11
                      Heard it on the radio

                      I was cruising PA Dutch country heading to a customer's place. Needless to say there wasn't a television in the office I went to and I had to wait a few hours to watch tape of it all.
                      John Erlichman, one of President Richard Nixon's closest aides, has admitted America's "War on Drugs" was a hoax designed to vilify and disrupt "the antiwar left and black people" when it was launched in 1971.

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                      • #12
                        I was watching it live!

                        I remember being in middle school and they stopped school for us to watch the launch as it included teacher.

                        It certainly is a moment that I will never forget.

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                        • #13
                          i was in the lab at work

                          I don't think al gore had invented the internet yet so I think we watched the news on a little TV
                          "I could buy you." - The Village Idiot

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                          • #14
                            Me too. I played fake sick/skipped school that day. Was at my grandparent's house watching Press Your Luck with them when it came on.

                            3rd and Inches was listening to Take On Me by A-ha on Volume 11. Cuz it's louder than 10. 11.

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                            • #15
                              "But even if the crew cabin had survived intact, wouldn’t the violent pitching and yawing of the cabin as it descended toward the ocean created G-forces so strong as to render the astronauts unconscious?
                              That may have once been believed. But that was before the investigation turned up the key piece of evidence that led to the inescapable conclusion that they were alive: On the trip down, the commander and pilot’s reserved oxygen packs had been turned on by astronaut Judy Resnik, seated directly behind them. Furthermore, the pictures, which showed the cabin riding its own velocity in a ballistic arc, did not support an erratic, spinning motion. And even if there were G-forces, commander Dick Scobee was an experienced test pilot, habituated to them.
                              The evidence led experts to conclude the seven astronauts lived. They worked frantically to save themselves through the plummeting arc that would take them 2 minutes and 45 seconds to smash into the ocean.
                              That is when they died — after an eternity of descent."


                              Makes the whole thing even worse. Youd hope if something terrible like that happens atleast you would die instantly without even knowing. Cant imagine what that 3 minutes must have been like.

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